Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products

Presented on: January 6th at 7:00 PM EST




Resources

  • Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products
    Why do some products capture widespread attention while others flop? What makes us engage with certain products out of sheer habit? Is there a pattern underlying how technologies hook us? Nir Eyal answers these questions (and many more) by explaining the Hook Model—a four-step process embedded into the products of many successful companies to subtly encourage customer behavior. Through consecutive “hook cycles,” these products reach their ultimate goal of bringing users back again and again without depending on costly advertising or aggressive messaging. (Amazon Link)
  • Nir and Far Blog
    Blog


View Upcoming Events View Past Event Recordings

In an age of ever-increasing distractions, quickly creating customer habits is an important characteristic of successful products. How do companies create products people use every day? What are the secrets of building services customers love? How can we create products compelling enough to “hook” users? 

Bestselling author Nir Eyal has constructed a framework for designing better products. He will share his years of research in this practical webinar. He will provide you with a new way of thinking of the necessary components of changing user behavior by studying how the world’s most engaging products keep users coming back again and again.

About the author: Nir Eyal writes, consults, and teaches about the intersection of psychology, technology, and business. The M.I.T. Technology Review dubbed Nir “The Prophet of Habit-Forming Technology.” Nir founded two tech companies since 2003 and has taught at the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford. He is the author of the bestselling book, Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products, which won the “Marketing Book of the Year” award from 800 CEO Read. In addition to blogging at NirAndFar.com, Nir’s writing frequently appears in TechCrunch, Inc, The Harvard Business Review, and Psychology Today.

 


The views expressed by presenters are their own and their appearance in a program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Reference to any specific product or entity does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by University of Maryland, College Park.