Stop Outdated Behaviors: A New Strategy to Achieve Lasting Changes in Eating and Exercise

What if you could easily and joyfully resolve the in-the-moment conflicts that often derail your eating and exercise goals? Much of what we’re taught about creating change in eating and exercise is simplistic, outdated, and for many of us, misguided. In this provocative, science-driven webinar, sustainable-behavior-change researcher and health coach Michelle Segar, Ph.D., MPH, MS, explains why popular conventions, like habit formation, can’t work for most people when it comes to changing complex healthy behaviors. Instead, Michelle contends that many of us need to rethink our behavior change strategies. You will learn how to turn outdated behavior changes on its head to reveal a flexible, fun, and brain-based approach to creating changes in eating, exercise, and self-care that finally have the potential to stick.

About the author: Michelle Segar, Ph.D., MPH, MS, author of The Joy Choice: How to Finally Achieve Lasting Changes in Eating and Exercise.  She is an award-winning, NIH-funded sustainable-behavior-change researcher and a lifestyle coach. For nearly three decades, she has pioneered methods to create sustainable health behavior changes that are being used to boost patient health, employee well-being, and gym membership retention.  As a psychologist who aims to contribute toward societal-level change, Michelle is honored to advise the World Health Organization’s physical activity initiatives and to be invited to serve as the inaugural chair of the United States National Physical Activity Plan’s Communication Committee (2014-2017).  Michelle's organizational consulting clients have included leading organizations like Walmart, WW, Anytime Fitness, and Kaiser Permanente. She is frequently interviewed in major media outlets like The New York Times, NPR, Prevention, Real Simple, and The Wall Street Journal. Michelle is a sought-after speaker and trainer and lives with her husband and son in Ann Arbor, Michigan.


The views expressed by presenters are their own and their appearance in a program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Reference to any specific product or entity does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by University of Baltimore.